God’s Creature Teachers

God’s Creature Teachers

There is a siege (yes, look it up) of herons that hangs out around the waterfall near the Converse Bridge on Main Street, part of the pond where Sandy’s Island is located, I think it’s called Mill Pond. There are often herons there. Last week, for about 20 minutes, I watched three of them standing on a rock and some branches. Finally, the one on the rock dipped into the water and came up with a fish, about 5 or so inches long, maneuvered it in its beak so that it could be swallowed and down the gullet it went…patience rewarded. Satisfied, this heron flew off…having filled its need. One of the herons on a branch then went over and stood on the rock, figuring that must be the place to be, waiting its turn…patiently. The first heron rested in a nearby tree, content to share the best fishing spot.

And when it started to rain, the herons had enough common sense to seek shelter under the bridge…while I stood there watching…in the rain…getting wet.

We are supposed to be the most intelligent form of life God created…but we have a lot to learn from the so-called less intelligent ones…like patience…and sharing…and being happy satisfying our “needs” instead of our “wants”…and seeking God’s shelter in the storms of life.

– Brian Rogers

Watch and Listen

 

A Father’s Gift

A Father’s Gift

Nature is important to me and I believe that we are all part of nature and you can see God and talk with God in the natural world. I’ve written about this before.

As I think about my father with Father’s Day approaching, I can picture walking in the woods with him when I was young and him pointing out all there was to be taken in…the singing birds, scurrying squirrels, blossoming flowers, majestic trees…each intricate leaf and even the dirt under our feet. We would walk in silence after a while, then he would sing this song…more say it than sing it. He sang like I do, best suited for solitude in the woods and not within hearing distance of other people. But he “sang” anyway. As I got older I didn’t walk in the woods so much and the words of the song faded but, thanks to him, I never lost my appreciation for nature, for God’s world and our place in it.

The natural world is an overwhelming gift if you just stop to think about it…and appreciate it…and be a part of it. God gave it to all of us. It’s our job to take care of it.

As I was thinking about my dad, this song from so long ago popped into my mind and jogged my memory of those walks in the woods. I didn’t remember the words but now I “sing” a line or two as I walk, again not so anyone can hear and I promise I won’t sing it to you…but I do want to share it with you.

– Brian Rogers

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Sure On This Shining Night

Sure On This Shining Night

This week’s Musical Meditation will be the final installment before taking a break for the summer. With late, warm evenings upon us, I’m thinking of Sure On This Shining Night by the quintessential and vastly underrated American composer, Samuel Barber.

The text, by James Agee, invites us to turn our gaze upward and reflect on what we have endured.  It is my sincere prayer that these long, warm summer evenings find you with the late year behind you, healed and in good health.

– Logan Henke, Music Minister

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An Easter Reflection

An Easter Reflection

by Lauren Gilstrap Milley

Christians spend a lot of time at Easter focusing on Jesus rising from dead. While that’s important, it tends to overshadow the first part of the story. Jesus was – executed. Executed as a criminal. Why? Well, that’s the part of Easter that I think far too many of us “good church going Christians” conveniently overlook. Ironically, it’s exactly the part of Easter that makes it a story for absolutely everyone.

If Jesus had just been some nice guy walking around telling people to love their neighbor and turn the other cheek, would the Romans have really cared? Probably not. Instead, he was executed by the state because his message was much more dangerous.

His message was that things don’t have to be this way. There is a better way and it’s all of our responsibility to make it better. His message wasn’t about how to live in a racist world – his message was how to stand against racism and forge a new world without it. His message wasn’t just about how to forgive unfair police brutality – his message was stand with the persecuted, overturn the tables and rebuild a better system, one that’s fair for everyone. Jesus wasn’t a pacifist. Pacifists don’t get executed by the state.

So what makes Easter everyone’s story? Easter is the story of God (however you define that) saying “yes” to Jesus’ message of compassion and justice and “no” to the greedy, self-serving powers of the status quo.

Whether you believe in a bodily resurrection or not, because of Easter, Jesus’s message of a better, more fair, more just world has outlived the Empire that killed him by centuries. Because of Easter, we all should stand with those society marginalizes, speak up for the voiceless, put our pocketbooks and our pride on the line for what we know to be right.

The social expression of love is justice. That is what Jesus taught and that is what he gave his life for. Easter is God saying “no matter what they do to you, I got your back, keep going, keep fighting – light will always outshine the darkness.” And that makes it a story for everyone – everyone and anyone who wants to make the world better.

Happy Easter, Happy Spring and here’s to keeping the faith, fighting the good fight, getting in good, necessary trouble and leaving this world just a little better than we found it.

Walk Humbly With God

Walk Humbly With God

A Holy Week Reflection by Brian Rogers

Passion Week! Many emotions this week…the lowest of lows at the crucifixion, the highest of highs with Jesus overcoming death. What strikes me as an overriding theme of Passion Week is humility: the humility of Jesus, first to take on human life, and then, with humility, to wash his apostles’ feet, to go through the passion for all of us. Anne spoke eloquently about the nine Fruits of the Spirit. I believe that humility is the gateway, not only to forgive as Jesus did on the cross, but also to every one of the nine Fruits.

Humility opens the door to those Fruits so that they flourish in our lives. The Fruits wither on the vines without humility. It seems that humility is difficult to attain, retain and sustain in our society that values achievement, status and material monuments to self. Focusing on other people with needs greater than ours takes humility. Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Generosity, Faithfulness, Gentleness, Self-Control: without humility, can we ever truly have any of these fruits? We are made in the image of God and I’m not more in God’s image than the homeless person or those of different ethnicity, religions, sexual orientation or social status. The height of humility is Jesus dying on the cross…Passion Week for us.

C.S. Lewis notes “True humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less.”

Philippians 2:5-8: Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, He humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.

Prayer for Humility
Let me have too deep a sense of humor to be proud.
Let me know my absurdity before I act absurdly.
Let me realize that when I am humble I am most human,
most truthful, and most worthy of your serious consideration.
– Daniel A. Lord, SJ

Rock Concert

Rock Concert

As Jesus rode into Jerusalem for the last time, his disciples thronged around him, cheering him on. When religious leaders told him to calm his followers, Jesus told them that if the people were silent, the very rocks beneath their feet would cry out in their place. What about today? Are there times when we fall silent and leave it to the stones to speak out? Join us Sunday under the tent as we begin our journey through Holy Week.

– Pastor Anne